A Comparison of Two Global Positioning System Devices for Team-Sport Running Protocols

Willmott A.G.B., James C.A., Bliss A., Leftwich R.A., Maxwell N.S.

Objective: This study investigated the comparability and reliability of global positioning system (GPS) devices during running protocols associated with team sports.

Participants: Fourteen moderately-trained males participated in the study.

Methods: Participants completed three running protocols: 690 m of straight-line movements, a 570 m change of direction (COD) course, and a 642.5 m team-sport simulated circuit (TSSC), on two occasions. They wore a FieldWiz GPS device and a Catapult MinimaxX S4 10-Hz GPS device. The study calculated the typical error of measurement (TE) and coefficient of variation (CV%) between GPS devices for total distance and peak speed. Reliability comparisons were made within FieldWiz GPS devices between sessions.

Findings:

Small TE were observed between FieldWiz and Catapult GPS devices for total distance and peak speed during straight-line (16.9 m [2%], 1.2 km/h [4%]), COD (31.8 m [6%], 0.4 km/h [2%]), and TSSC protocols (12.9 m [2%], 0.5 km/h [2%]), respectively, with no significant mean bias (p > 0.05).
Small TE were also observed for the FieldWiz GPS device between sessions (p > 0.05) for straight-line (9.6 m [1%], 0.2 km/h [1%]), COD (12.8 m [2%], 0.2 km/h [1%]), and TSSC protocols (6.9 m [1%], 0.6 km/h [2%]), respectively.
Data from the FieldWiz GPS device appears comparable to established devices and reliable across a range of movement patterns associated with team sports.
Conclusion: The study concludes that the FieldWiz GPS device demonstrates comparability to established devices and reliability across various running protocols associated with team sports.

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